The World Social Forum and African women

January 9, 2007 at 2:34 pm 1 comment

The 7th edition of the World Social Forum brings the world to Africa as activists, social movements, networks, coalitions and other progressive forces from Asia-Pacific, Latin America, the Caribbean, North America, Europe and all corners of the African continent converge in Kenya for five days of cultural resistance and celebration. This blog launches open Democracy’s 50.50 initiative which aims to promote the inclusion of women in the global debate.

Patricia Daniel will be blogging the WSF live from Nairobi on behalf of openDemocracy.net. You can also read her personal blog here.

The first World Social Forum (WSF) meeting took place in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil in 2001, aiming to challenge the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos. The WSF has since become an annual event for individuals and organisations opposing the neo-liberal policies of the WEF – which have particular impact on the sovereignty, human rights and livelihoods of people in the developing world.

The WSF belief is expressed in their slogan: “another world is possible”. But to what extent does this include a women’s perspective?

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Entry filed under: Women in Africa.

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  • 1. womenwsf  |  January 16, 2007 at 2:18 pm

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